Can rain cause headaches

When it rains outside, it means that a front is moving through the area, which causes a change in air pressure. The change in air pressure during a rainy day can lead to sinus pain, or a sinus headache, according to “USA Today.”

Can weather cause headaches?

For some people, weather changes may cause imbalances in brain chemicals, including serotonin, which can prompt a migraine. Weather-related triggers also may worsen a headache caused by other triggers. If you feel your migraines are triggered by weather, you may be understandably frustrated.

Do migraines cause headaches?

Migraine. If you suffer from migraines, you may feel one coming on when a storm approaches, due to accompanying change in barometric pressure. Indeed, recent research shows weather changes can influence headaches. “More than half of migraine sufferers have a weather trigger,” headache specialist Emad Estemalik,…

Can a thunderstorm cause a headache?

Thunderstorms as a Headache Trigger. This creates the elements of a thunderstorm, like wind and rain. The change in barometric pressure may be what triggers your headache, whether that is a migraine, tension-type headache, or a sinus headache. That said, the idea of a storm triggering a headache is still a questionable phenomenon.

Why do I get Headaches in the rain?

If weather changes consistently trigger your headaches, being prepared for managing your headache when rain clouds are brewing (or your unique weather-related trigger is occurring) can only serve to help you in the end.

Why could weather be causing your headache?

One possible reason for the increase in headaches during hot weather could be dehydration, which is a recognized migraine trigger.

Could your worsening headache be related to the weather?

Weather-related triggers also may worsen a headache caused by other triggers. If you feel your migraines are triggered by weather, you may be understandably frustrated. After all, you can’t change the weather.

Can hot weather trigger headaches?

For some people, hot weather can trigger headaches. While this weather connection isn’t well understood, headaches are known to be related to dehydration and other heat-related illnesses.

Why do you get headaches before a storm?

If you develop headaches before a big storm or when flying, these headaches might be due to barometric pressure. Although they’re caused by a dramatic change in the air pressure around you, you can treat a barometric pressure headache like other types of headaches.