Endoscopy what to expect

  • The procedure starts with an intravenous sedative administration.
  • An anesthetic spray or gargle is given to numb the throat.
  • The endoscope is passed through the mouth into the intestine and examination is done by monitoring the visuals inside. Air is blown inside for this, to get a clearer view.
  • Sometimes, biopsy is also done with this procedure in which a small tissue sample is taken from the intestines or stomach.

Risks and complicationsRisks and complications

  • Difficulty in breathing
  • Perforated intestinal lining
  • Hypotension
  • Sweating

For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.

Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: Focus Medica.

  • https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/endoscopy/about/pac-20395197

    • Why It’s Done
    • Risks
    • What You Can Expect
    • Results
    • Clinical Trials

    Explore further

  • https://www.healthgrades.com/right-care/upper-gi…

     · What you experience after endoscopy depends on your health, your specific procedure, and other factors. Post-procedure symptoms relate to either the sedation for the procedure or the endoscopy procedure itself. Common symptoms after an upper endoscopy include: Amnesia or fragmented memories of your outpatient stay; Bloating; Grogginess; Impaired swallowing

  • https://www.austingastro.com/2017/11/17/acid-reflux-hurting-know-2

    • Why Would I Need An Endoscopy?
    • Before The Endoscopy
    • During The Endoscopy
    • Published: Nov 17, 2017
    • People also askWhat you should know about an endoscopy?What you should know about an endoscopy? 9 Things You Should Know About Endoscopy What Is an Endoscopy? An endoscopy is a medical procedure in which an endoscope, a tube-like instrument with a light… Common Types of Endoscopy Endoscopy procedures can be done on many parts of the body and are often named after the… Why You May Need an Endoscopy Endoscopy is often used to diagnose a medical condition. More

      Preparation

      • Do not consume any solid or liquid foods for at least 8 hours before the test.
      • Inform the doctor in detail about the medical history including treatments in past like surgeries, allergies, medications and nutritional supplements taken, if any.

      During the test

      During the test

      • The procedure starts with an intravenous sedative administration.
      • An anesthetic spray or gargle is given to numb the throat.
      • The endoscope is passed through the mouth into the intestine and examination is done by monitoring the visuals inside. Air is blown inside for this, to get a clearer view.
      • Sometimes, biopsy is also done with this procedure in which a small tissue sample is taken from the intestines or stomach.

      Risks and complications

      Risks and complications

      • Difficulty in breathing
      • Perforated intestinal lining
      • Hypotension
      • Sweating

      For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.

      Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: Focus Medica.

    • https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/endoscopy/about/pac-20395197

      • An upper endoscopy is a procedure used to visually examine your upper digestive system with a tiny camera on the end of a long, flexible tube. A specialist in diseases of the digestive system (gastroenterologist) uses an endoscopy to diagnose and, sometimes, treat conditions that affect the esophagus, stomach and beginning of the small intestine (duodenum).The medical term for an upper endoscopy is esophago…
      • Why It’s Done
      • Risks
      • What You Can Expect
      • Results
      • Clinical Trials
      • An upper endoscopy is used to diagnose and, sometimes, treat conditions that affect the upper part of your digestive system, including the esophagus, stomach and beginning of the small intestine (duodenum).Your doctor may recommend an endoscopy procedure to: 1. Investigate signs and symptoms. An endoscopy may help your doctor determine what’s causing digestive signs and symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, difficulty swallowing and gastrointestinal bleedi…

      Explore further

    • https://www.healthgrades.com/right-care/upper-gi…

      May 13, 2020 · What you experience after endoscopy depends on your health, your specific procedure, and other factors. Post-procedure symptoms relate to either the sedation for the procedure or the endoscopy procedure itself. Common symptoms after an upper endoscopy include: Amnesia or fragmented memories of your outpatient stay; Bloating; Grogginess; Impaired swallowing

    • https://www.austingastro.com/2017/11/17/acid-reflux-hurting-know-2

      • Why Would I Need An Endoscopy?
      • Before The Endoscopy
      • During The Endoscopy
      • There are a number of reasons your doctor might recommend an endoscopy, and most fall into three categories – diagnosis of symptoms, monitoring known illnesses, or treatment of disease. Some of the signs or symptoms that would prompt a need for an EGD include unexplained, persistent pain of the upper abdomen, especially if you are over 50 years old; persistent nausea and vomiting; unexplained anemia; frank (or hidden) blood in your vomit or stool; difficulty swallowing; or abnormal …
      • Published: Nov 17, 2017
      • People also askWhat you should know about an endoscopy?

        What you should know about an endoscopy?

        9 Things You Should Know About Endoscopy What Is an Endoscopy? An endoscopy is a medical procedure in which an endoscope, a tube-like instrument with a light… Common Types of Endoscopy Endoscopy procedures can be done on many parts of the body and are often named after the… Why You May Need an Endoscopy Endoscopy is often used to diagnose a medical condition. More

        Why would my doctor order an endoscopy?

        The reasons for performing an endoscopy are varied and your doctor may recommend it in case you have an intestinal problem like bleeding or pain, throat problems like difficulty in swallowing or a change in bowel habits. The doctor uses the endoscope to carefully observe any problems that may require evaluation, diagnosis or treatment.

        What does it feel to have an endoscopy?

        Upper endoscopy helps your doctor evaluate symptoms of persistent upper abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or difficulty swallowing . It’s the best test for finding the cause of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. It’s also more accurate than X-ray for detecting inflammation, ulcers and tumors of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum.

        What can be diagnosed with an endoscopy?

        Endoscopy can also help identify inflammation, ulcers, and tumors. Upper endoscopy is more accurate than X-rays for detecting abnormal growths such as cancer and for examining the inside of the upper digestive system. In addition, abnormalities can be treated through the endoscope.

        What do you need to know about an endoscopy?

        Doctors will often recommend endoscopy to evaluate: Stomach pain Ulcers, gastritis, or difficulty swallowing Digestive tract bleeding Changes in bowel habits (chronic constipation or diarrhea) Polyps or growths in the colon

        What do I need to know about an upper endoscopy?

        What do I need to know about an upper endoscopy? An upper endoscopy is also called an upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, or an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). A scope (thin, flexible tube with a light and camera) is used to examine the walls of your upper digestive tract.

        What are doctors looking for during endoscopy?

        Doctors will often recommend endoscopy to evaluate: Stomach pain. Ulcers, gastritis, or difficulty swallowing. Digestive tract bleeding. Changes in bowel habits (chronic constipation or diarrhea) Polyps or growths in the colon.

        What are the risks of an endoscopy?

        Risks of endoscopy may include: infection of the area of investigation: this most commonly occurs when additional procedures are carried out at the same time. The infections are normally minor and treatable with a course of antibiotics perforation or tear of the lining of the stomach or esophagus occurs in 1 in every 2,500-11,000 cases