Hepatitis viral load

A viral load of less than 615 IU/mL (international units per milliliter) means there’s no detectable hepatitis C virus, or it’s too low to detect. Additionally, a viral load of more than 800,000 IU/mL is high, and less than 800,000 IU/mL is low. During treatment, a falling viral load is an indication that treatment is succeeding.

What does “viral load” mean?

Viral load is the amount of viral particles present in the blood stream, as detected by the proteins or building blocks of the virus, the RNA.

How important is viral load?

The viral load is used to determine how effectively your antiretroviral drugs are working and can even tell doctors when your treatment is failing or you are not taking your drugs as prescribed. The goal of HIV therapy is to prevent HIV from replicating in order to bring the viral population down to an undetectable level.

What is a high/low viral load in a hepatitis C test?

Generally, a viral load of 800,000 IU per mL or more is considered high, while a viral load of less than 800,000 IU per mL is considered low. If your viral load is low when you’re tested for Hepatitis C, you may have a better chance of responding to currently available medicines. List of references (click here)

Is HCV core antigen a reliable marker of viral load?

Hepatitis C viral (HCV) load detection and quantification is routinely accomplished by HCV RNA measurement, an expensive but essential test, both for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC). HCV core antigen (Ag) testing has been suggested as an attractive alternative to molecular diagnostics.

What is an acceptable viral load?

A viral load exceeding 10,000 copies is considered to be high. Levels may be recorded in the tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands and even reach one million or more copies/mL. A viral load above 40,000 copies/mL is considered to be very high.

How important is viral load?

The viral load is used to determine how effectively your antiretroviral drugs are working and can even tell doctors when your treatment is failing or you are not taking your drugs as prescribed. The goal of HIV therapy is to prevent HIV from replicating in order to bring the viral population down to an undetectable level.

How often should my Viral load be tested?

For patients in whom an undetectable viral load is achieved, testing should be repeated every 3 to 4 months. If viral suppression is sustained for at least two years, testing can be extended to every six months.

What increases viral load?

An increase in viral load can occur for many reasons, such as: not taking antiretroviral medication consistently. the HIV has mutated (changed genetically) antiretroviral medication isn’t the right dose. a lab error occurred. having a concurrent illness.