How do atherosclerosis plaques form

Arteriosclerosis Atherosclerosis

A condition where the arteries become narrowed and hardened.

, sometimes called “hardening of the arteries,” occurs when fat (cholesterol) and calcium build up inside the lining of the artery wall, forming a substance called plaque. Over time, the fat and calcium buildup narrows the artery and blocks blood flow through it. Atherosclerosis can happen in all arteries.

How does atherosclerosis cause plaque?

Plaque, caused by atherosclerosis, is surrounded by a fibrous cap. This fibrous cap may tear or rupture. A tear or rupture tells the body to repair the injured artery lining, much as it might heal a cut on the skin by forming a blood clot to seal the area.

What is the definition of atherosclerosis?

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood to your heart and other parts of your body. Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood.

What is atherosclerotic plaque?

Atherosclerotic plaque constitutes the underlying entity of atherosclerotic diseases including coronary artery disease (CAD). As already we have described in Chapter 1 of this textbook, arteries are consisted of three layers from inner to outer: intima, media and adventitia ( Fig. 1.3.1 ).

How does atherosclerosis affect blood flow?

As plaque builds up, the wall of the blood vessel thickens. This narrows the channel within the artery, which reduces blood flow. That, in turn, lessens the amount of oxygen and other nutrients reaching the body. Watch an animation about atherosclerosis.

How does atherosclerosis affect the heart?

Atherosclerosis refers to the buildup of fats, cholesterol and other substances in and on your artery walls (plaque), which can restrict blood flow. The plaque can burst, triggering a blood clot. Although atherosclerosis is often considered a heart problem, it can affect arteries anywhere in your body.

What is the definition of atherosclerosis?

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood to your heart and other parts of your body. Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood.

How does bad cholesterol cause atherosclerosis?

When bad cholesterol, or LDL, crosses a damaged endothelium, it enters the wall of your artery. Your white blood cells stream in to digest the LDL. Over the years, cholesterol and cells become plaque in the wall of your artery. Plaque creates a bump on your artery wall. As atherosclerosis gets worse, that bump gets bigger.

How does smoking cause atherosclerosis?

The cause of atherosclerosis isn’t completely known. Many scientists believe plaque begins when an artery’s inner lining (called the endothelium) becomes damaged. Four possible causes of such damage are: Smoking plays a big role in the progression of atherosclerosis in the aorta (the body’s main artery), coronary arteries and arteries in the legs.